SSL certificates are needed because they encrypt the data exchange between your website and the visitor’s browser, making it impossible for hackers to get access to this data. This is especially important if you store your customers’ credit card information. For a complete website hosting experience, HostPapa provides you with a Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificate completely free of charge!

ImageShack has a non-premium account option and a free 30-day trial to check out the premium features. This image hosting alternative has a great looking interface, somewhat similar to how Pinterest showcases its images in a pinboard-style layout. You can use it to upload as many high-res photos as you want, create albums, organize everything with tags and discover featured photos from other users for inspiration.

A complex site calls for a more comprehensive package that provides database support and application development platforms (e.g. ASP.NET, ColdFusion, Java EE, Perl/Plack, PHP or Ruby on Rails). These facilities allow customers to write or install scripts for applications like forums and content management. Also, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is typically used for websites that wish to keep the data transmitted more secure.
You can easily create folders and sub-galleries to organize your photos, either on your desktop or your smartphone. To share a photo, you just have to right-click on it, copy the link, and paste it wherever you want to share it. You can also import your contacts and directly email them the link to your photo or entire gallery. If you allow them to, visitors can even download your photos or albums. 

Every domain registrar is required to maintain a publicly viewable "WHOIS" database that displays contact details (including home address and phone number) for every registered domain, but you can keep your identity private by opting to take advantage of HostGator Domain Privacy Protection. We'll hide your personal contact information from public view, protecting you from spam and identity theft, while also making it possible for interested parties to still contact you through your domain registry while still protecting your anonymity.
Think of your domain name as a street address for your website. Without a domain name, you would have to tell customers to visit your website at an IP-based url such as 123.123.123.123/~yourwebsite instead of yourwebsite.com. The former is not very memorable or friendly to human eyes and will surely result in not that many visits to your website. While it is not mandatory that you have a website domain name, nor is it mandatory that a domain you own be attached to a website, for a successful online presence you truly will want to get your own domain name to ensure your website has the proper air of professionalism and appropriate branding.
You can configure your privacy options if you want to share your photos with a selected audience and you have the opportunity to easily upload from a variety of platforms including via the web, your mobile device, email or other photo applications. The official Flickr mobile app is stunning and actually one of the best features of the platform. You may also want to take advantage of the Flickr Uploader tool that allows you to seamlessly backup your photos from your computer, Apple iPhoto, Dropbox and other places.
One option not mentioned in the article is Amazon Photos. Even though I’m an Amazon “prime” customer, I had never really given their photo storage much thought because I already had several sites I use for photo sharing and storage. However, I recently learned that they will store your photos in their original size AND your RAW (CR2, NEF, ARW….) photos too! This is a HUGE advantage for me.

The term Internet host or just host is used in a number of Request for Comments (RFC) documents that define the Internet and its predecessor, the ARPANET. RFC 871 defines a host as a general-purpose computer system connected to a communications network for "... the purpose of achieving resource sharing amongst the participating operating systems..."[2]
Middle English ost, host "person who receives guests, guest," borrowed from Anglo-French oste, hoste, going back to Latin hospit-, hospes "guest, visitor, person receiving guests," going back to dialectal Indo-European *ghosti-pot- (whence probably also Old Church Slavic gospodĭ "lord, master"), from *ghost-i- "outsider, guest" + *pot- "one in control, master" — more at guest entry 1, potent entry 1
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