The user gets his or her own Web server but is not allowed full control over it (user is denied root access for Linux/administrator access for Windows); however, they are allowed to manage their data via FTP or other remote management tools. The user is disallowed full control so that the provider can guarantee quality of service by not allowing the user to modify the server or potentially create configuration problems. The user typically does not own the server. The server is leased to the client.
I’d stay away from imgur. They’re basically a social media site now, with reputations that go up or down, presumably based on other users’ opinions of you. They’ve also changed the way their albums work-now if you make an album public, you can’t add any new images, and I could find no instructions on how to UNDO making an album public. Their organization style is awful, making it almost impossible to find anything you might actually want. The front page features their “hot” images, which are a mixed bag of political BS, things you might want to see, and vulgar/gross imagery.

PostImage allows you to create a gallery with a unique link to share with others. Individual files also each have a direct link that you can share with others. You can resize your photos when you upload them. If you’re planning on only sharing an image once, you can choose to let the photo expire after one day, one week, or one month. If you don’t want the photos to expire, they’ll stay on the site forever.


Flickr is also a social networking site, so you can share your photos with the entire Flickr community. There are many groups for different interests and topics, including nature, black and white photography, and fashion. Users can favorite others’ photos and leave comments. If you want more privacy, you can edit your privacy settings so you’ll only share photos with selected individuals.
A handful of domains will have restrictions on them, which means you can only purchase them if you meet or exceed certain criteria or have authorization (some examples are .gov, .edu and .mil). But most extensions are available to everyone. In fact, most country code Top Level Domains (ccTLDs) are available for anyone to purchase, even if you don't reside in the country code in question.
The term Internet host or just host is used in a number of Request for Comments (RFC) documents that define the Internet and its predecessor, the ARPANET. RFC 871 defines a host as a general-purpose computer system connected to a communications network for "... the purpose of achieving resource sharing amongst the participating operating systems..."[2]
If you have purchased domain names that you no longer need, you can sell them through Namecheap. When you are ready to sell, you can list your domain in our Marketplace for a fixed price. We will add your domains to our searchable list, visited by thousands of people every day. When you buy domain names from Namecheap, we guarantee the best available support from managing, to selling, to renewals.

Having multiple servers hosting the same content for better resource utilization. Clustered servers are a perfect solution for high-availability dedicated hosting, or creating a scalable web hosting solution. A cluster may separate web serving from database hosting capability. (Usually web hosts use clustered hosting for their shared hosting plans, as there are multiple benefits to the mass managing of clients).[9]

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